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Victorian curriculum connections

Kinder – Grandma Gerty & Grandpa George

History
From Foundation to Level 2, students study personal, family and local history. Students learn about their own history and that of their family, including stories from different cultures and other parts of the world. As participants in their own history, students develop their knowledge and understanding of how the past is different from the present. Students also learn about continuity and change in family life by comparing the present with the past. They begin to explore the links, and the changes that occur, over time. Students explore, recognise and appreciate the history of their local area by examining remains of the past and considering why they should be preserved.

Relevant key questions:

  • How has family life changed or remained the same over time?
  • What remains of the past are important to the local community? Why?
  • How have changes in technology shaped our daily life?

Personal and Social Capability
Social Awareness and Management: “Practice the skills required to include others and make friends with peers, teachers and other adults”

Early Years Learning and Development Outcomes

Identity; Children develop knowledgeable and confident self-identities. This is evident, for example, when children:

  • develop their social and cultural heritage through engagement with Elders and community members

Community; Children respond to diversity with respect. This is evident, for example, when children:

  • begin to show concern for others
  • explore the diversity of culture, heritage, background and tradition and that diversity presents opportunities for choices and new understandings
  • become aware of connections, similarities and differences between people
  • listen to others’ ideas and respect different ways of being and doing
  • notice and react in positive ways to similarities and differences among people.

Learning; Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity. This is evident, for example, when children:

  • express wonder and interest in their environments
  • participate in a variety of rich and meaningful inquiry-based experiences


Levels F-2 – Then & Now

History
Personal and Community Histories

From Foundation to Level 2, students study personal, family and local history. As participants in their own history, students develop their knowledge and understanding of how the past is different from the present. Students also learn about continuity and change in family life by comparing the present with the past. They begin to explore the links, and the changes that occur, over time. Students explore, recognise and appreciate the history of their local area by examining remains of the past and considering why they should be preserved.

Relevant key questions:

  • What is my personal and family history?
  • How has family life changed or remained the same over time?
  • What remains of the past are important to the local community? Why?
  • How have changes in technology shaped our daily life?

Geography
From Foundation to Level 2, the curriculum develops the concept of place through a study of what places are like over time and how they are defined. The emphasis in F-2 is on the places in which students live, but they also start to investigate other places of similar size that are familiar to them or that they are curious about.

Relevant key questions:

  • What are places like?
  • How and why are people connected to their place and other places?
  • What makes a place special?
  • How can we care for places?

English
From Foundation to Level 2, students communicate with peers, teachers, known adults, and students from other classes (and community members L2). Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read and view spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is to entertain, as well as some texts designed to inform and persuade (L2).

Critical and Creative Thinking
From Foundation to Level 2, the curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understanding to express reasoning and to problem solve and learn more effectively. Students become familiar with key vocabulary and simple strategies to structure and improve thinking. Students develop an understanding that thinking can be made explicit.

Personal and Social Capabilities
Levels 1-2:
The curriculum focuses on enabling students to learn about making and keeping friends and understanding the effects that their actions have on others. Students extend their vocabulary to describe the emotions they experience when interacting with others. Students develop an understanding that others can have different opinions and they learn to identify appropriate ways to respond to these differences. The curriculum provides opportunities for students to use skills required for participation in group tasks. Students practise the skills to solve simple problems.


Levels 3-4 – Simple Machines

History
Levels 3-4:
Students explore the history and diversity of their community. In this band, students will apply the following historical concepts and skills to the historical knowledge: sequencing chronology, using historical sources as evidence, identifying continuity and change, analysing causes and effect and determining historical significance.

Science
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum focus is on recognising questions that can be investigated scientifically and undertaking investigations. They apply their knowledge to make predictions based on interactions within systems, including those involving the actions of humans.

Physical Sciences. Forces can be exerted by one object on another through direct contact or from a distance.

Technologies
Levels 3-4: Students develop ways of thinking about their peers and communities and as consumers and a sense of self and ownership of their ideas. Students explore and learn to harness their creative, innovative and imaginative ideas and approaches to achieve designed solutions. They show an understanding of the importance of planning when designing solutions, in particular when collaborating.

Critical and Creative Thinking
Levels 3-4: The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understanding to improve and monitor thinking. Students learn and consider the advantages of different thinking techniques. Students learn there are different ways to respond to problems, visualise thinking and think more effectively.


Levels 3-6 – Living in the Old Days


History
Community and First Contacts
Levels 3-4:
Students explore the history and diversity of their community and the celebrations and commemorations, symbols and emblems important to Australians and others. They are introduced to world history and movement of peoples.

Relevant key questions:

  • Who lived here first and how do we know?
  • How has our community changed?
  • What features have been lost and what features have been retained?

Geography

Levels 3-4 key questions:

  • How and why are places similar and different?
  • How does the environment support the lives of people and other living things?
  • How can people use places and environments more sustainably?

Levels 5-6 key questions:

  • How do places, people and cultures differ across the world?
  • How do people’s connections to places affect their perception of them?
  • How do people and environments influence one another?

English
Levels 3-4: Students experience learning in familiar contexts and a range of contexts that relate to study in other areas of the curriculum. They interact with peers and teachers from other classes and schools in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual environments. Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade …

Critical and Creative Thinking
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understanding to improve and monitor thinking. Students learn and consider the advantages of different thinking techniques. Students learn there are different ways to respond to problems, visualise thinking and think more effectively.

Personal and Social Capabilities
Levels 3-4:
They learn about the importance of valuing difference in individuals and groups and how appreciating diversity contributes to positive relationships. The curriculum provides opportunities for students to learn to work both independently and in teams.


Levels 3-6 – Gold Rush Immigration


History
Community and First Contacts
Levels 3-4:
Students explore the history and diversity of their community. Students examine the impact of exploration on other societies, how these societies interacted with newcomers, and how these experiences contributed to their cultural diversity.

Relevant key questions:

  • What is the nature of the contribution made by different groups and individuals in the community?
  • Why did the Europeans settle in Australia?

Historical knowledge:

  • The role that people of diverse backgrounds have played in the development and character of the local community and/or other societies


From Colony to Nation
Levels 5-6: Students study colonial Australia … Students learn about the way of life of people who migrated to Australia and their contributions to Australia’s economic and social development.

Relevant key questions:

  • What do we know about the lives of people in Australia’s colonial past and how do we know?
  • Who were the people who came to Australia? Why did they come?
  • What contribution have significant individuals and groups made to the development of Australian society?

Historical knowledge:

  • The causes and the reasons why people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the perspectives, experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony


Civics and Citizenship

Levels 3-4:
Students also explore how individuals participate in their community, cultural diversity and how belonging to different groups can shape personal identity.

Geography
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum continues to develop students’ mental map of the world and their understanding of place.

Levels 5-6: The curriculum focuses on the concepts of place and interconnection. Students’ mental maps of the world are further developed… The scale of study goes global as students investigate the geographical diversity and variety of connections between people and places.

English
Levels 3-4: Students experience learning in familiar contexts and a range of contexts that relate to study in other areas of the curriculum. They interact with peers and teachers from other classes and schools in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual environments. Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade.

Levels 5-6: Students communicate with peers and teachers from other classes and schools, community members, and individuals and groups, in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual environments.
Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view, interpret and evaluate spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade.

Critical and Creative Thinking
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understanding to improve and monitor thinking. Students learn and consider the advantages of different thinking techniques. Students learn there are different ways to respond to problems, visualise thinking and think more effectively.

Levels 5-6: The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understanding to test the strength of thinking. Students develop their capacity to deliberately manage their thinking. Students explore common errors that can occur in thinking.

Intercultural Capability
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum provides the opportunity for students to compare different cultures.

Levels 5-6: The curriculum provides the opportunity for students to explore aspects of their life that are culturally determined. Students further develop their awareness of cultural diversity…

Personal and Social Capability
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum focuses on developing students’ understandings of positive relationships and connections. …They learn about the importance of valuing difference in individuals and groups and how appreciating diversity contributes to positive relationships.

Levels 5-6: Students consider the characteristics of respectful relationships and the behaviours that demonstrate sensitivity to diversity.

Cross curriculum priorities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and culture.
History Levels 3-4: The nature of contact between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and others, for example, the Macassans and the Europeans, and the effects of these interactions.

History Levels 5-6:
The nature of convict or colonial presence, including the factors that influenced changing patterns of development, how the environment changed, and aspects of the daily life of the inhabitants, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
History Levels 5-6: The causes and the reasons why people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the perspectives, experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony.
The stories and perspectives of people who migrated to Australia, including from one Asian country, and the reasons they migrated.


Levels 3-6 – Chinese on the Goldfields


History
Community and First contacts
Levels 3-4:
Students explore the history and diversity of their community. Students examine the impact of exploration on other societies, how these societies interacted with newcomers, and how these experiences contributed to their cultural diversity.

Relevant key questions:

  • What is the nature of the contribution made by different groups and individuals in the community?
  • Why did the Europeans settle in Australia?

Historical knowledge:

  • The role that people of diverse backgrounds have played in the development and character of the local community and/or other societies

From Colony to Nation
Levels 5-6:
Students study colonial Australia in the 1800s and the development of Australia as a nation, particularly after 1900. Students look at the founding of British colonies and the development of a colony. They learn about what life was like for different groups of people in the colonial period. Students learn about the way of life of people who migrated to Australia and their contributions to Australia’s economic and social development.

Relevant key questions:

  • What do we know about the lives of people in Australia’s colonial past and how do we know?
  • Who were the people who came to Australia? Why did they come?
  • What contribution have significant individuals and groups made to the development of Australian society?

Historical knowledge:

  • The causes and the reasons why people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the perspectives, experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony.

Civics and Citizenship
Levels 3-4:
Students also explore how individuals participate in their community, cultural diversity and how belonging to different groups can shape personal identity.

Levels 5-6: Students expand on their knowledge of the law by studying how laws affect the lives of citizens. Students investigate the role of groups in our community and examine the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizens.

Geography
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum continues to develop students’ mental map of the world and their understanding of place.

Levels 5-6: The curriculum focuses on the concepts of place and interconnection. Students’ mental maps of the world are further developed through learning the locations of the major countries in the Asia region, Europe and North America. The scale of study goes global as students investigate the geographical diversity and variety of connections between people and places

Ethical Capabilities
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to evaluate particular acts, and to identify and critically respond to ethical problems. Students extend their vocabulary and begin to reflect on means and ends. Students develop an understanding that particular acts and their outcomes can be valued differently by different people, and extend their understanding of factors that may effect decision-making and actions.

Levels 5-6: The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to evaluate the significance of ethical matters. Students explore the basis of a range of ethical principles and reflect on means and ends. Students consider decision-making approaches based on thinking about the consequences and duties. Students develop an understanding that a range of factors play a role in ethical decision-making.

Intercultural Capability
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum provides the opportunity for students to compare different cultures.

Levels 5-6: The curriculum provides the opportunity for students to explore aspects of their life that are culturally determined. Students further develop their awareness of cultural diversity and reflect on intercultural experiences…

Personal and Social Capability
Levels 3-4:
The curriculum focuses on developing students’ understandings of positive relationships and connections. …They learn about the importance of valuing difference in individuals and groups and how appreciating diversity contributes to positive relationships.

Levels 5-6: Students consider the characteristics of respectful relationships and the behaviours that demonstrate sensitivity to diversity.

Cross curriculum priorities

Learning about Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia
History Levels 5-6:
The causes and the reasons why people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the perspectives, experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony. The stories and perspectives of people who migrated to Australia, including from one Asian country, and the reasons they migrated.


Levels 5-6 – Put Yourself in the Eureka Story

History
From Colony to Nation

Levels 5-6:
Students study colonial Australia in the 1800s and the development of Australia as a nation. Students look at the founding of British colonies and the development of a colony. They examine significant events and people, political and economic developments. Students explore the experiences of democracy and citizenship over time. Students understand the significance of Australia’s British heritage, the Westminster system, and other models that influenced the development of Australia’s system of government.

Relevant key questions:

  • What were the significant events and who were the significant people that shaped Australian colonies?
  • What contribution have significant individuals and groups made to the development of Australian society

Historical knowledge:

  • The effects of a significant development or event on a colony.

Civics and Citizenship
Levels 5-6: Curriculum introduces students to the key values of Australia’s liberal democratic system of government. Students expand on their knowledge of the law by studying how laws affect the lives of citizens. Students investigate the role of groups in our community and examine the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizens.

Geography
Levels 5-6:
The curriculum focuses on the concepts of place and interconnection. Students’ mental maps of the world are further developed through learning the locations of the major countries in the Asia region, Europe and North America. The scale of study goes global as students investigate the geographical diversity and variety of connections between people and places.

Ethical Capabilities
Levels 5-6:
The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to evaluate the significance of ethical matters. Students explore the basis of a range of ethical principles and reflect on means and ends. Students consider decision-making approaches based on thinking about the consequences and duties. Students develop an understanding that a range of factors play a role in ethical decision-making.

Personal and Social Capability
Levels 5-6:
They identify the reasons for and the impact of conflict and suggest strategies to reduce or resolve conflict.


Levels 5-6 – Gold Fever

History
From Colony to Nation

Levels 5-6:
Students study colonial Australia in the 1800s and the development of Australia as a nation. Students look at the founding of British colonies and the development of a colony. They learn about what life was like for different groups of people in the colonial period. They examine significant events and people, political and economic developments, social structures, and settlement patterns. Students explore the experiences of democracy and citizenship over time.

Relevant key questions:

  • How did colonial settlement change the environment?
  • What were the significant events and who were the significant people that shaped Australian colonies?
  • Who were the people who came to Australia? Why did they come?
  • What contribution have significant individuals and groups made to the development of Australian society?

Historical knowledge:

  • The nature of colonial presence, including the factors that influenced changing patterns of development, how the environment changed, and aspects of the daily life of the inhabitants,

Civics and Citizenship
Levels 5-6:
Curriculum introduces students to the key values of Australia’s liberal democratic system of government. Students expand on their knowledge of the law by studying how laws affect the lives of citizens. Students investigate the role of groups in our community and examine the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizens.

Economics and Business
Levels 5-6:
Students explore the importance of economic and financial decision-making in everyday life. They consider the concept of opportunity cost and examine why decisions about the ways resources are allocated to meet needs and wants in their community involve trade-offs.

Geography
Levels 5-6:
The curriculum focuses on the concepts of place and interconnection. Students’ mental maps of the world are further developed through learning the locations of the major countries in the Asia region, Europe and North America. The scale of study goes global as students investigate the geographical diversity and variety of connections between people and places.

Mathematics
Level 5:
They solve multiple digit problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division by single digit divisors with remainders. Students represent, compare and order unit fractions. Students choose and use suitable metric and other units for measurement of length, angle, area, volume, capacity and mass.

Level 6: Students carry out mental, written and technology based computation to solve whole number problems involving all four operations.

Critical and Creative Thinking
Levels 5-6: The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understanding to test the strength of thinking. Students develop their capacity to deliberately manage their thinking.

Ethical Capabilities
Levels 5-6: The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to evaluate the significance of ethical matters. Students explore the basis of a range of ethical principles and reflect on means and ends. Students consider decision-making approaches based on thinking about the consequences and duties. Students develop an understanding that a range of factors play a role in ethical decision-making.

Personal and Social Capability
Levels 5-6: The curriculum provides opportunities for students to experience various team roles including leadership, and to reflect on their performance in group tasks. They identify the reasons for and the impact of conflict and suggest strategies to reduce or resolve conflict.

How Gold Fever fits Catholic Education Melbourne’s Learning and Teaching in a Catholic School framework.


Levels 5-6 – Goldfields Technology


History
From Colony to Nation

Levels 5-6: Students study colonial Australia in the 1800s and the development of Australia as a nation. Students learn about the way of life of people who migrated to Australia and their contributions to Australia’s economic and social development.

Relevant key questions:

  • What do we know about the lives of people in Australia’s colonial past and how do we know?
  • How did colonial settlement change the environment?

Science
Levels 5-6: Science as a human endeavour
Scientific understandings, discoveries and inventions are used to inform personal and community decisions and to solve problems that directly affect people’s liveIn

Levels 7-8: The curriculum focus is on explaining phenomena involving science and its applications. They explain changes in an object’s motion by considering the interaction between multiple forces.

Technologies
Levels 5-6:
Students engage with ideas beyond the familiar, exploring how design and technologies and the people working in a range of technologies contexts contribute to society. They seek to explore innovation and establish their own design capabilities. Students are given new opportunities for clarifying their thinking, creativity, analysis, problem-solving and decision-making. Using a range of technologies to communicate, including a variety of graphical representation techniques, students represent objects and ideas in a variety of forms such as thumbnail sketches, models, drawings, diagrams and storyboards to illustrate the development of designed solutions. Students will have the opportunity to create designed solutions involving Engineering principles and systems.

Critical and Creative Thinking
Levels 5-6:
The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understanding to test the strength of thinking. Students develop their capacity to deliberately manage their thinking.


Levels 5-6 – Living in the Putrid Past


History
From Colony to Nation

Levels 5-6:
Students experience aspects of daily life in the 19th century.

Relevant key question:

  • What do we know about the lives of people in Australia’s colonial past and how do we know?

Geography
In exploring the interconnections between people and environments, students examine how human actions influence the environmental characteristics of places.

Science
Science as a human endeavour
– Scientific understandings, discoveries and inventions are used to inform personal and community decisions and to solve problems that directly affect people’s lives.

Critical and Creative Thinking
Questions and Possibilities
– Examine how different kinds of questions can be used to identify and clarify information, ideas and possibilities.


Levels 5-10 – Aboriginal People on the Goldfields


History
Levels 5-6: They learn about what life was like for different groups of people in the colonial period Level 7 and 8: How physical or geographical features influenced the development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ communities, foundational stories and land management practices Level 9 and 10: Intended and unintended causes and effects of contact and extension of settlement of European power(s), including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Geography
Levels 5-6:
The curriculum focuses on the concepts of place and interconnection. Influence of people, including the influence of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, on the environmental characteristics of Australian places.
Levels 9-10:
Land and resource management strategies used by Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander peoples to achieve food security over time.

Technologies
Levels 7-8:
Analyse how food and fibre are produced when creating managed environments and how these can become more sustainable

Ethical
Levels 5-6:
Analyse how food and fibre are produced when creating managed environments and how these can become more sustainable.
Levels 9-10:
The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to analyse and evaluate ethical problems and their resolution and to identify and manage contestability in ethical matters. Students reflect on whether there are ethical concepts and principles common across people, groups and cultures.

Intercultural Understandings
Levels 5-6:
The curriculum focus is on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to enable students to learn about diverse cultural practices and beliefs and how they compare with their own.
Levels 7-8:
The curriculum focus is on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to reflect on how cultural practices and beliefs contributes to individual, group and national identities.
Levels 9-10:
The curriculum focus is on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to engage in complex discussions about interrelationships within and between cultures.

Cross curriculum priorities

Learning about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples histories and Culture
History Levels 5-6:

  • Identify and describe patterns of continuity and change in daily life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, ‘native born’ and migrants in the Australian colonies.
  • The nature of convict or colonial presence, including the factors that influenced changing patterns of development, how the environment changed, and aspects of the daily life of the inhabitants, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • The different experiences and perspectives of Australian democracy and citizenship, including the status and rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, migrants, women, and children.

Learning about Sustainability
Levels 5-6 History:
The nature of convict or colonial presence, including the factors that influenced changing patterns of development, how the environment changed, and aspects of the daily life of the inhabitants, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Levels 9-10 History: Analyse and evaluate the broad patterns of change over the period 1750-present.


Levels 7-10 – Environmental Impacts of Colonisation & Gold

History
Levels 7-8: Identify and explain patterns of continuity and change in society to the way of life.
How physical or geographical features influenced the development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ communities, foundational stories and land management practices.

Levels 9-10: Analyse and evaluate the broad patterns of change over the period 1750-present.
Changing social, cultural, historical, economic, environmental, political and technological conditions on a major global influence in Australia.
Analyse the long term causes, short term triggers and the intended and unintended effects of significant events and developments.

Economics
Levels 9-10:
Research the way the work environment is changing in contemporary Australia and analyse the implications for current and future work.

Geography
Levels 7-8: Spiritual, cultural and aesthetic value of landscapes and landforms for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, that influence the significance of places, and ways of protecting significant landscapes.
Human causes of land degradation, the effects on landscape quality and the implications for places.

Levels 9-10: Land and resource management strategies used by Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander peoples to achieve food security over time.
Human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres and the environmental effects of these alterations.
Causes and consequences of an environmental change, comparing examples from Australia and at least one other country.
The interconnection between food production and land and water degradation; shortage of fresh water; competing land uses; and climate change, for Australia and other areas of the world.

Science
Levels 7-8: Some of Earth’s resources are renewable, but others are non-renewable.

Technology
Levels 7-8: Analyse how food and fibre are produced when creating managed environments and how these can become more sustainable.

Ethical Capabilities
Levels 9-10: Explore a range of ethical problems and examine the extent to which different positions are related to commonly held ethical concepts and principles, considering the influence of cultural norms, religion, world views and philosophical thought.

Intercultural Capabilities
Levels 9-10: The curriculum provides the opportunity for students to understand the importance of cultural collaboration in an interconnected world and how respecting diversity is important for community cohesion.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives
The Victorian Curriculum includes the knowledge and skills students are expected to develop about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders histories and cultures, given their particular and enduring importance.

Sustainability
Learning about Sustainability allows students to develop the knowledge, skills, values and world views necessary to contribute to more sustainable patterns of living. Learning about Sustainability has an increasing local, national and global resonance. Australia’s future prosperity will be impacted by past, present and future decisions, particularly in relation to the environmental, social and economic challenges.


Levels 9-10 – The Industrial Revolution in Australia

History
Levels 9-10: The Making of the Modern World and Australia
Industrial Revolution (1750 - 1914)

Historical knowledge:

  • Causes that led to the Industrial Revolution, and other conditions and ideas that influenced the industrialisation of Britain and of Australia
  • Causes of population movements and settlement patterns during this period and the significant changes to the way of life of groups of people
  • Different experiences and perspectives of individuals or groups and how ideas, beliefs and values changed during the significant events of the Industrial Revolution
  • Significant effects of the Industrial Revolution, including global changes in landscapes, movements of people, development and influence of ideas, political and social reforms, and transport and communication

Economics
Levels 9-10:
Students explore the relationship between economic performance and living standards as well as the reasons why these differ across regions within and between economies. Students examine the role of innovation and its influence on business success.

Geography
Levels 9-10: Environmental change and management focuses on investigating environmental geography. It begins with an overview of environmental change and the factors that influence it. Students investigate a specific environmental change in Australia and one other country. They examine the causes and consequences of the change and strategies to manage the change.

Relevant key question:

  • What are the causes and consequences of change in places and environments?

Science
Levels 9-10:
Sciene as a human endavour. Advances in scientific understanding often rely on developments in technology and technological advances are often linked to scientific discoveries.
Physical Sciences. The description and explanation of the motion of objects involves the interaction of forces and the exchange of energy and can be described and predicted using the laws of physics

Technologies
Levels 9-10:
They (students) are introduced to a global perspective, with opportunities to understand the complex interdependencies involved in the development of technologies and enterprises. Students specifically focus on preferred futures, taking into account ethics, legal issues, social values, economic, environmental and social sustainability factors,

Ethical Capabilities
Levels 9-10:
The curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to analyse and evaluate ethical problems and their resolution and to identify and manage contestability in ethical matters. Students reflect on whether there are ethical concepts and principles common across people, groups and cultures.

Sustainability
Levels 9-10 History:

  • Analyse and evaluate the broad patterns of change over the period 1750-present
  • Changing social, cultural, historical, economic, environmental, political and technological conditions on a major global influence in Australia
  • Analyse the long term causes, short term triggers and the intended and unintended effects of significant events and developments


Levels 9-10 – Australia & Asia

History
The Making of the Modern World and Australia
Australia and Asia 

Historical knowledge:

  • Intended and unintended causes and effects of contact and extension of settlement of European power(s), including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • Significant events and influencing ideas in the development of the society, including different perspectives of the events at the time and different historical interpretations and debates.
  • Patterns of continuity and change and their effects on influencing movements of people, ways of life and living conditions, political and legal institutions, and cultural expression around the turn of the twentieth century.
  • Different experiences and perspectives of non-Europeans and their perspectives on changes to society, significant events, ideas, beliefs and values.

Civics and Citizenship
Levels 9-10:
Students examine the ways political parties, interest groups, media and individuals influence government and decision-making processes.

Geography
Levels 9-10:
Geographies of interconnections focuses on investigating how people, through their choices and actions, are connected to places throughout the world in a wide variety of ways, and how these connections help to make and change places and their environments.

Ethical Capability
Levels 9-10:
the curriculum focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to analyse and evaluate ethical problems and their resolution and to identify and manage contestability in ethical matters. Students reflect on whether there are ethical concepts and principles common across people, groups and cultures.

Intercultural Capability
Levels 9-10:
the curriculum focus is on developing the knowledge, skills and understandings to engage in complex discussions about interrelationships within and between cultures. This includes the less tangible aspects of culture such as values, attitudes, roles, religious beliefs and ways of thinking.

Cross curriculum priorities

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Culture
History Levels 9-10: Intended and unintended causes and effects of contact and extension of settlement of European power(s), including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Learning about Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia
History Levels 9-10: Different experiences and perspectives of non-Europeans and their perspectives on changes to society, significant events, ideas, beliefs and values.


VCE – Australian History

Unit 3: Transformations; Colonial Society to Nation
AREA OF STUDY 1
The re-shaping of the Port Phillip District

Key questions:

  • How did Aboriginal and British arrivals’ understanding of land management and land ownership differ in the Port Phillip District/Victoria?
  • What were the demographic and political consequences of the gold rushes?
  • What were the responses of and outcomes for Aboriginal people following the arrival of the pastoral and goldrush colonists?

Outcome 1
On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse the nature of change in the Port Phillip District/Victoria in the period 1834-1860.
To achieve this outcome the student will draw on key knowledge and key skills outlined in Area of Study 1.

Key knowledge:

  • Aboriginal understandings about land, including communal ownership, belief in the sacredness of the land shaped by spirit beings, and the importance of participation in rituals to nurture the land, and their land use and management practices
  • British settlers’ understanding about land, including property rights and private ownership and the doctrine of land ‘improvement’ through agricultural cultivation and their appropriation of the ‘uncultivated’ lands of the Indigenous peoples
  • The motivations of non-pastoralist immigrants and their experiences, including bounty and assisted immigrants
  • Aboriginal responses to the transformation of their physical and cultural environment, including resistance, adaptation, interaction and accommodation with the newcomers and retention of cultural values
  • The outcomes for Aboriginal communities of pastoralist expansion and the gold rushes, including environmental damage and loss of food resources, dispossession from their lands, servitude, frontier violence and disease
  • Demographic and political consequences of the gold rushes, including democratic and new world aspirations, European and Chinese digger protests against unfair taxation, the demand for manhood suffrage, the secret ballot, the push for the eight-hour day and reform to unlock the land from the squatters


VCE – Outdoor & Environmental Education

Unit 3 Relationships with Outdoor Environments
Students look at Indigenous land use and the early squatters in Victoria before taking a tour to learn about the impact of industrialisation. Finally they look at the selectors of the late nineteenth century as we headed towards nationhood.

Victorian curriculum connections

Area of Study 1: Historical relationships with outdoor environments

Key knowledge:

  • relationships with Australian outdoor environments expressed by specific Indigenous communities before and after European colonisation
  • relationships with Australian outdoor environments as influenced by:
    - the first non-Indigenous settlers’ experiences
    - increasing population
    - industrialisation
    - nation building


VCE – Geography Tourism

Area of Study 1: The Characteristics of Tourism

Key knowledge:

  • The characteristics of domestic and international tourism
  • The changing characteristics of tourism over time
  • The location and distribution of different types of tourism and tourist destinations
  • Factors affecting the different types of tourism at selected locations
    Including:
    - natural and human characteristics of host destinations
    - development of transport and communication technology
    - international agreements and national policies
    - changing income and lifestyles
    - investment and marketing
    - regional occurrences, for example major events, disasters, diseases, and economic and political situations
  • the use of spatial technologies by the tourism industry for the identification of different types of tourism and tourist destinations and the factors affecting domestic and international tourism.

Area of Study 2: The Impacts of Tourism

Key knowledge:

  • The environmental and economic impacts of tourism
  • Socio-cultural impacts of tourism at origin and destination
  • The range of management strategies responding to environmental, economic and socio-cultural impacts, and the consequences of these responses
  • The effectiveness of management strategies in response to the impacts of tourism
  • The environmental sustainability, economic viability and socio-cultural value of tourism
  • The role of planning for sustainable outcomes in tourism.
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